‘Dresden’ (=Erica verticillata)

Bushy, medium-sized, erect shrub growing to an average height of 1.6m, but old specimens may reach up to 1.8m tall; 1-1.5m broad. The flowers are medium to dark pink (darker pink than ‘Tresco’ lighter than ‘Adonis’), tubular, 15mm long, 3mm diameter; umbellately arranged (3, mainly 4 flowered), on very short (3mm) lateral branches arising from the main stem, arranged in dense, whorled, pseudo-racemes below the ends of flowering branches. (Normally 3, occasionally 4 verticels per synflorescence)

The external morphology of the Dresden form is marginally different from the other Erica verticillata forms. The flowers are smaller and more congested, verticels fewer; non-flowering lateral branches are less ordered, normally arranged in single whorls or dispersed up the main stems and only a few are arranged in whorls of three (3-5) on the upper third of the stems.

Origins: This specimen comes from a small market garden nursery, Heidegartnerei Grunberg in Dresden, specializing in Erica. It is recorded at Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens with the accession number, 14/2012 and cultivar ‘Dresden’. Herr Hemut Heidl bought it at a market in Berlin many years ago when Dresden was in East Germany. Cuttings were donated by Helmut Heidl GbR Wasserschwenden 3.87452 Altusried / Krugzell.Fax 0049 (0) 8374 – 23435  Web:www.hiedl-gbr.de. Landowner: N/A: Mail: hiedl-gbr@t-online.de. Landowner org: Heidegartnerei Grunberg. Landowner ph: 49 (03523) 71130 ® E.2018:01 registered on 10 April 2018 by Anthony Hitchcock Kirstenbosch National Botanical Gardens Nursery, Living Collections and Threatened Species Manager

 

‘Spring Light’ (=Erica x cavendishiana)

Flowers yellow, May–June; foliage mid-green; habit upright, to 30cm tall, 20cm spread after 2 years (not pruned). More floriferous than ‘Gengold’ and upright.

Origins: deliberately raised seedling by Kurt Kramer, made in 2003 (03-14-2) between unnamed seedlings, both from Erica × cavendishianaGengold’ (Erica nana × patersonii), selected in 2008.

Being of South African origin the plant is not regarded as hardy in the UK and is preferably grown in a pot, using ericaceous compost, and brought into a frost free, light and airy environment during the winter months.

® E.2013:01  registered by Kurt Krammer, Edewecht, Germany.

‘Cherise’ (=Erica verticillata)

Medium-sized, erect shrub, to an average height of 1.0–1.3m, to 0.5–1.0m broad. Flowers dark reddish-pink, tubular, 17mm long, 4mm diameter, arranged in terminal 4-flowered (or less freqently 3- or 5-flowered) umbels, on very short lateral branches. Synflorescences neat, spike-like, each with up to 6 whorls of flowering branches, on strong, erect main branches; terminal apex of the stem continuing growth. Non-flowering lateral branches on the main flowering stems to 4–9cm long, in whorls of 5 or 6. Foliage dark green, glossy; leaves to 5mm long. Seed produced sparsely.

Origins: accession number 549/06 (obtained from Nurserymen’s Exchange, Monterey, California, USA). This clone was marketed in USA and UK under the registered trademark RUBY LACE™.

Named by Anthony Hitchcock after Cherise Viljoen, horticulturist at Kirstenbosch National Botanic Garden.

Being of South African origin the plant is not regarded as hardy in the UK and is preferably grown in a pot, using ericaceous compost, and brought into a frost free, light and airy environment during the winter months.

® E.2012:11  registered by Anthony Hitchcock, Nursery, Plant Collections & Threatened Species Program Manager Kirstenbosch National Botanic Garden.

‘Harry Wood’ (=Erica verticillata)

Medium-sized, erect shrub, to an average height of 1.0–1.2m, to 0.6m broad. Flowers light pink, tubular, 20mm long, 4mm diameter, arranged in terminal 4-flowered or occasionally 5-flowered umbels, on very short lateral branches arranged in whorls. Synflorescences neat, spike-like, each with up to 6 whorls of flowering branches, on strong, erect main branches; terminal apex of the stem continuing growth. Non-flowering lateral branches on the main flowering stems to 4–5cm long, in whorls of 5 or occasionally spirally arranged. Foliage dark green, leaves to 5mm long. Seed produced. Similar to ‘Doctor Violet Gray’ (accession number 548/06)

Origins: accession number 657/06 received from Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew (accession number 1961-9001). Harry Wood, Curator of the Fernkloof Nature Reserve, Hermanus, sent seed to Kew in 1961.

Being of South African origin the plant is not regarded as hardy in the UK and is preferably grown in a pot, using ericaceous compost, and brought into a frost free, light and airy environment during the winter months.

® E.2012:10  registered by Anthony Hitchcock, Nursery, Plant Collections & Threatened Species Program Manager Kirstenbosch National Botanic Garden.

‘Tresco Abbey’ (=Erica verticillata)

A small, rounded shrub, to an average height of 0.6m; to 0.5m broad. Flowers medium pink, tubular, 15mm long, 3mm diameter, arranged in terminal, 3- or 4-flowered (rarely 2-flowered) umbels, on very short lateral branches arranged in whorls. Synflorescences neat, spike-like, each with 3 (sometimes 4) whorls of lateral flowering branches, on thin, erect branches; terminal apex generally, but not always, continuing growth and then much less pronounced. Non-flowering lateral branches greatly elongated, to 14–21cm long, erect, reaching almost up to the apex of the shrub, spirally arranged. Foliage dark green, leaves to 4mm long, spirally arranged.

Origins: accession number 543/06; clone propagated from a plant in Tresco Abbey Gardens, Isles of Scilly, of unknown origin. ‘Tresco Abbey’ is noticeably different from all the other clones as there are no conspicuous flowerbearing stems; flowers are smaller and flowering whorls fewer. Seed sparsely produced.

Being of South African origin the plant is not regarded as hardy in the UK and is preferably grown in a pot, using ericaceous compost, and brought into a frost free, light and airy environment during the winter months.

® E.2012:08  registered by Anthony Hitchcock, Nursery, Plant Collections & Threatened Species Program Manager Kirstenbosch National Botanic Garden.

‘Belvedere’ (=Erica verticillata)

Medium, erect shrub, to an average height of 1.7m, to 1m wide; old specimens to 2.0m. Flowers light pink, translucent in sunlight, tubular, 20mm, 3mm diameter; arranged in terminal, 4-flowered (occasionally 3-, 5- or 6-flowered) umbels on very short lateral branches arranged in whorls. Synflorescences neat, spike-like, each with up to 6 whorls of flowering branches, on strong, erect main branches; terminal apex of the stem continuing growth. Non-flowering lateral branches on the main flowering stems in whorls of 5. Foliage green; leaves to 5mm long. Seed produced.

Origins: accession number 109/01; this clone came from Belvedere Palace, Vienna, and probably originated from collections made for Emperor Frans Joseph II by George Scholl between 1796 and 1799. It has been cultivated in Vienna since early 1800s

Being of South African origin the plant is not regarded as hardy in the UK and is preferably grown in a pot, using ericaceous compost, and brought into a frost free, light and airy environment during the winter months.

® E.2012:07  registered by Anthony Hitchcock, Nursery, Plant Collections & Threatened Species Program Manager Kirstenbosch National Botanic Garden.

‘Adonis’ (=Erica verticillata)

Bushy, medium-sized shrub, to average height of 1.4–1.6m, old specimens to 2.0m; 0.7–1.0m broad. Flowers dark pink, tubular, 20mm long, 4mm diameter; arranged in terminal, 4- or 5-flowered (rarely 3- or 6-flowered) umbels, on very short lateral branches arranged in whorls. Synflorescences spike-like, not neat, each with up to 6 whorls of flowering branches on strong, erect, main branches; terminal apex of the stem continuing growth. Non-flowering lateral branches on the main flowering stems to 3cm long, arranged in whorls of 6. Foliage green, leaves to 5mm long, appearing crowded. Viable seed produced. Smaller and bushier than ‘African Phoenix’ with less orderly synflorescences; overall thicker, heavier and bushier in appearance.

Origins: accession number 273/12; propagated from what was apparently one large, old specimen growing in a forest clearing behind the braille trail at Kirstenbosch believed to be a remnant from an early collection, possibly the one made for Kirstenboch by Mrs Bolus in 1917. Progeny had pale and dark pink flowers: the paler clone is ‘Louisa Bolus’.

It was rediscovered by Senior Foreman Adonis Adonis in 1990.

Being of South African origin the plant is not regarded as hardy in the UK and is preferably grown in a pot, using ericaceous compost, and brought into a frost free, light and airy environment during the winter months.

® E.2012:06  registered by Anthony Hitchcock, Nursery, Plant Collections & Threatened Species Program Manager Kirstenbosch National Botanic Garden.

 

‘African Phoenix’ (=Erica verticillata)

Tall, erect shrub, average height 1.8m, old specimens to 2.5m; 1.2–1.4m broad. Flowers medium pink, tubular, 18mm long, to 4mm diameter, in terminal, 3-, 4- or 5-flowered umbels, on very short lateral branches arranged in whorls. Synflorescences neat, spike-like, each with up to 6 whorls of flowering branches, on strong, erect, main branches; terminal apex of the stem continuing growth. Non-flowering lateral branches on the main flowering stems in whorls of 5. Foliage green; leaves to 5mm long. Seed produced.

Origins: clone from Protea Park, Pretoria; cutting taken and introduced to Kirstenbosch in 1984 (accession number 536/84); used for planting in Rondevlei Nature Reserve in 1994 where it has produced seedlings.

Being of South African origin the plant is not regarded as hardy in the UK and is preferably grown in a pot, using ericaceous compost, and brought into a frost free, light and airy environment during the winter months.

® E.2012:05  registered by Anthony Hitchcock, Nursery, Plant Collections & Threatened Species Program Manager Kirstenbosch National Botanic Garden.

‘Can-Can’ (=Erica cerinthoides)

Flowers red; V-X; foliage green; habit tall woody; height 1.5m if not burnt.

A selected clone of the “Fire Erica”, one of a few Ericas that resprout from a woody rootstock after fire. The result is the production of clusters of lovely inflated, tubular, red flowers at the ends of short branches, which form neat, colourful shrublets in a bleak burnt landscape. Fire thus keeps this plant in good healthy condition and will stimulate flowering at any time of the year. After a number of years they will grow taller, become straggly and produce fewer flowers.

See plantzafrica for more details on species.